Monday, 15 May 2017

Liberated insight

Stepping back
When we look.  truly look, so much is visible. Learning to paint has helped me to look more closely at so much.  Not just the canvas.  What I find so interesting, is that when I am painting up close, I often doubt that what I am doing is going to work.  Then I step back and see the shadows and highlights and am amazed at how it all come together.

The same is to be said about any relationship.  With people or animals.  When in the thick of it, you either have faith, or doubt.  Is either of these misguided? 
When we step back, we can see what is truly going on.  With whom are we truly in a fulfilling relationship ?  Who are we trying to please?  Who do we find enthusiastic?  Who is a taker? Who is a giver?  Does the animal truly wish to be with us?  Does the person really care about us? 

Liberated insight.
And then we can proceed without attachment.  And truly be in relationship for relationship sake.

Light on the rainbow bridge

Dear Jula

It has been 2 years since you left this realm.


Lessons since you parted

               

                Broken hearts do not mend – their pain simply colours a new perspective

                As the days pass, I don’t miss you any less – simply put more conscious energy into the time spent with loved ones

                Your inspired 100% - is hard to live up to in the moments of missing you.  So you are misssed with 100% energy

                There is no limit to the amount of tears one can shed

                Gratitude for the time we had – and so wish it could be more

 

You are so missed gentle soul. 

 

 

Warriors do not have to fight.  They need to be.

When we ‘be’, we will inspire.

When we fight, we have reactive forces that displace truth.

Thank you for the ‘being’ that is still you…

 

Have loved you forever.  Will love you forever!

Saturday, 8 April 2017

see you soon

Been quiet – eagerly writing a new book.  The manuscript will be done in a couple of weeks.  Then I need to decide what to do with it.  Mmmmm.


Thank you feedspot for recognising this blog.  Much appreciated.

 

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Penguin adoption - Promises - South America Update

Dear PenguinPromises

The chicks have now left the colony and have set off on their winter
migration to sunny Brazil, leaving Promises at home in the colony. The
adults are not able to follow the chicks yet because they still have things
to do before following the chicks to Brazil. I attach a photo showing
chicks, juveniles and adults all gathering together on the beach, prior to
leaving the colony, each to their different destinations.

The chicks have never been to sea before, so they need time to build up the
strength in their flipper muscles. Flipper exercises on land are no
substitute for time spent out at sea, because flipper flapping requires a
lot more strength under water than on land. Until the chicks have spent many
weeks out at sea building up their strength and stamina, they lack the speed
necessary to catch fish. So after leaving the colony the youngsters hang
around the kelp beds feeding on shrimps and other slow moving creatures in
order to survive.

Kelp is the typical brown seaweed that you can see floating in the water
around the coast. You will often find pieces of it washed up on the beach,
and the long branches have capsules which pop when you press them. The kelp
is actually rooted on the seabed, just like a tree, and the branches are
many metres long, making the kelp as tall as a tree.

Trees require sturdy branches to reach their height, but kelp uses the
capsules of air that are all along the branches to make the branches float
up to the surface of the water so that the kelp can catch the sunlight. Kelp
is a plant, and it needs sunlight to grow just like trees do.

The kelp beds are like underwater forests, and like any forest, they are
full of animals. Snails and barnacles live on the branches of the kelp.
Shrimps and lots of other small creatures crawl and swim amongst the
branches of the kelp in order to hide from fish that would eat them, just
like small birds hide in trees and bushes for protection. Even small fish
live amongst these underwater forests hiding from larger fish.

The young penguins find plenty to eat amongst the kelp beds. They would not
survive without them. Over the coming weeks the youngsters will slowly
strengthen their muscles and learn to swim faster and faster, so that
finally they will be fast enough to catch fish. For the last 2 months the
chicks have been used to being fed top quality fish, with 5 star
room-service included, so it is a bit of a blow for them to now be
scavenging around amongst the kelp to catch shrimps.


Fortunately there are kelp beds all along the coastline between here and
Brazil.
It is a very long journey, but there is no rush. The young penguins move
from one kelp bed to another, feeding at each location, and very gradually
they will make their way northwards up the coast of Patagonia until they
eventually reach southern Brazil.

Punta Tombo in southern Argentina is about one quarter of the distance that
they need to travel to reach Brazil. During the last few days the penguin
colony at Punta Tombo, which has about 180,000 pairs of penguins, had their
population swollen to well over one million penguins. These are the young
penguins stopping off to rest on their journey northwards,

There are no penguin colonies in Brazil. That is to say there are no
breeding colonies in Brazil, and no penguins actually nest there. Brazil is
just a winter feeding ground where the penguins can avoid the cold and
gloomy winter days back home in the colony. Several penguin species from
several countries spend our southern winter off the Brazilian coast, without
ever coming ashore. Most Brazilians don't even know that they have so many
penguins just offshore.

When the adults arrive in Brazil too later this year, the population will
reach about 4 million penguins, comprising of Magellanic, Rockhopper and
Macaroni penguins, all from the Falkland islands and southern Argentina and
Chile.

Back home in the colony, Promises must now spend time out at sea catching
fish and relaxing. This rest and relaxation is very important for the
penguins' survival.
During chick-rearing Promises lost a lot of weigh, and must now replace that
lost weight so as to be back in good condition before the annual moult
(molt).
The annual moult takes about three weeks, and Promises cannot eat during
that period, so getting back into shape before the moult is vital.

When the adults were feeding the chicks they had to swim a long way every
day, bringing fish back to the nest from the feeding grounds. Now that the
chicks are no longer in the nest there is no need for Promises to return to
the nest every day. The adults can spend all their time just floating around
near to where the fish are, which saves a lot of time and energy.

When the penguins get hungry, Promises can just dive down and catch a few
fish.
Then they can relax floating in the water for hours. It must be very
relaxing bobbing up and down over the waves with nothing to do. When the
adults want to sleep, they just sleep floating in the water.

The adults will be out at sea relaxing and eating for about three weeks
before they return to the nest. I will write to you again when the penguins
are back home in the colony next month, undergoing their annual moult.

Best wishes from Mike

Saturday, 4 March 2017

Andy Seliverstoff - Great work on - What makes people kinder?

 

 

 

 

 

Andy Seliverstoff is a 58-year-old professional photographer from St. Petersburg, Russia.

 

 

Andy Seliverstoff / Via facebook.com

A few years ago some of Seliverstoff's friends asked him to take photos of their daughter Alice in a park. They had their gigantic Great Dane, Sean, with them, so they decided to incorporate him into the photos. After seeing the results, he knew he was on to something special.

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

Seliverstoff did another shoot with a child featuring big dogs, and told BuzzFeed News that he was "deeply touched" by the work. That was four years ago and he's been a dog photographer ever since.

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

The project has become his passion, which he chronicles in a book called "Little Kids and Their Big Dogs."

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

All of the photos are taken in St. Petersburg. Its extensive parks and colder climate help create some spectacular shots.

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

 

He also tries to ensure that the photos are taken where the dogs commonly walk and play with children in familiar surroundings so they are as natural as possible.

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

Seliverstoff says that most of the subjects in his photos are either children or grandchildren of people in his friend circle. He said that it's rare that people acquire big dogs while they have young kids, so most of these dogs were with the families before they had the children.

 

 

 

The photos depict the interactions between cute kids and these very gentle giants.

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

 

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

Seliverstoff said the goal of the series wasn't just to create beautiful pictures, but to capture the interaction between the children and the animals.

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

Andy Seliverstoff / Via revodanapublishing.com

The overall message he's trying to get across, he said, is simple: "Love for dogs and children makes people kinder."

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Understanding Dog Separation Anxiety

Love this blog. See below.

Hi ,

One of the most common problems I hear from fellow dog owners is the incredibly stressful case of separation anxiety. Dogs with separation anxiety can turn into nervous wrecks, and as owners, we don't know what to do.

We still need to go to work, buy groceries, and take care of our children. So, what can we do to train our dogs that it is okay when we leave, that we will return and they needn't worry? It's a tricky science with many people voicing their opinions.

But, in the end, it comes down to simply being there for your dog and not supporting their behaviour with reinforcement.

The Danger of Separation Anxiety

To start with, separation anxiety is often mistaken for excitement. When you return home and see your dog bouncing around wagging its tail, you probably assume that they are just very happy to see you. This may be the case, but it can also be a sign of excitability - the result of anguish they felt before.

That anguish comes about when they are left alone - some part of their canine instincts flashing that they are being abandoned, a death knell to dogs. You shouldn't feel guilty about leaving your dog. Most dogs can handle it perfectly well, and even those with anxiety can be retrained.

But, if you ignore it or allow them to continue showing that excitement, it is bad for their health. Not only can it progress to full blown depression and anxiety which hurts the heart, but it can result in destruction around your home.

Why Dogs Become Anxious

On a very basic level, separation anxiety is due to a dog's pack mentality. If they are left alone, they feel that they have been dropped from the pack. But, on a more immediate level, your dog is anxious because you have not clearly shown them that you are a solid, in command pack leader.

In the wild, a pack leader may often leave the pack for a time to hunt or scout ahead. If your dog sees you leave and gets upset, they very well might see you as a follower, and themselves as an alpha leader.

Your job is to take control of the situation and show them that you are not only the leader of your pack, but that you will return every time you leave. Dogs that openly accept their owner as pack leader are infinitely less stressed and anxious. They can trust in you to deal with the issues at hand.

Of course, not all separation anxiety is as complicated as a pack leader dilemma. Sometimes, it can be simply due to a lack of exercise. A dog that does not get enough exercise simply becomes agitated when you leave and will keep themselves busy while you're gone by destroying your home.

The easiest way to handle this is to make sure your dog gets a real walk before you leave - at least 30 minutes of solid walking. You should also walk your dog after you've returned home and waited the 15 minutes before greeting.

Giving Your Dog What She Needs
Good dog ownership consists of giving your dog what she needs, and not what she wants. This may sound cruel, but in reality, by treating your dog as a dog and not as a human being, you will provide them with the stable, protected environment she craves.

She will be able to relax when you leave and you'll know that your $200 shoes are still intact every day when you return home.

If you want even more comprehensive information about resolving separation anxiety in dogs, please check out:

http://clicks.aweber.com/y/ct/?l=PPgNE&m=k_38AK4XMWNO7vS&b=ctUDT2qLkVOw8YuhiBz5Sw

Talk to you soon,



Calvin Lewis

Founder, http://clicks.aweber.com/y/ct/?l=PPgNE&m=k_38AK4XMWNO7vS&b=xuPg8zishdSxy1KBDKg



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Sunday, 19 February 2017

Giving back to animals. A gift a day

Change happens.  It is inevitable.  It is what we resist and strive for.  Do we prepare the animals in our lives for change or do we wrap them in cotton wool and then see them stress when even the smallest thing changes.

Yes.  animals also have comfort zones. 
A suggestion for the animals in your life - provide them with a small gift everyday.
For your dog, it could be a plant he has never sniffed.  For your horse a rub on the shoulder.  For your cat, perhaps a bit of sand paper wrapped on a stick.  and tomorrow we start again with something new.  Something to look at, touch, sniff, feel, taste...  A new place to visit...

If you work with exotic animals it is called enrichment.  An essential part of working with animals!  Domestic animals deserve it too.

Basically when providing novel stimuli in the form of small gifts, we are preparing our loved ones for changes they may experience.  Then experiencing new things becomes the norm.  Perhaps even something they look forward to.